soup, broth, bone broth, cup of soup, healing broth, healing bone broth

Bone Broth: A Nutrient-Dense, Healing Elixir

By Catherine Winter

Many people are discovering the wonders of bone broth, and with good cause: not only is this soup immensely soothing when you’re under the weather, it’s one of the most nutrient-dense foods you can eat. Bones from animals that have been raised ethically (namely on organic feed and grass, and free-range living conditions) contain a startling amount of vitamins and minerals. By first roasting and then simmering those bones in water, all that goodness is leached out of them, and in turn, can be consumed by you.

Among the many benefits of bone broth, which include strengthening one’s immune system and promoting overall gut healing, it’s also ideal for reducing stress. When consumed mindfully, savouring each sip and picturing it healing one’s body, it becomes more than just a nourishing drink. It helps one stay in the present moment, which is as good for one’s emotional wellbeing as one’s physical health.

soup ingredients, soup vegetables

Ingredients:

3-4 pounds of beef bones: assorted meat and marrow bones are ideal. You can also toss in chicken bones, chicken feet, turkey wings… whatever you have on hand.
1 large onion, peeled and chopped
1 large carrot, peeled and diced
1 celery stalk, diced
1 large bunch of green onions, chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 pinch of summer or winter savoury
1 teaspoon parsley
Sea salt

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Preparation:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Place the bones in a heavy glass or ceramic baking dish and roast for about 45 minutes. The marrow should have softened or melted by this point, and that’s good! Pour the bones and any melty drippings into a large stock pot or slow-cooker.

Toss in the vegetables and herbs, and cover with about 2 inches of water. Add in the cider vinegar and a bit of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a low simmer for 6-10 hours. If you’re using a crock pot or slow-cooker, you can leave it for up to 24 hours. The longer you let this simmer, the more nutrients will be drawn out of the bones, and the flavours will develop beautifully.

Once done, allow to cool slightly and then strain through cheesecloth into another pot. Place this in the fridge until the excess fats and oils congeal into a thick mass on top, and scrape that off. (Reserve that fat: you can mix it with seeds and set it out in mesh bags for your wild bird friends.)

If your broth has gone gelatinous, don’t worry! That’s a good thing. It means that a lot of collagen has been drawn out of the bones, which is great for your own bone, joint, and muscle health. The broth will return to a liquid state once you’ve heated it up, and you can adjust the salt to taste before drinking it.

 

FTW Kitchen: Creamy Clam Chowder

By Catherine Winter

Another in our Souper Sunday series, this clam chowder recipe has been in my family for years. I recently made a batch of this with potatoes, carrots, and a bit of parsley from the garden, and it’s just gorgeous for a chilly autumn or winter evening.

You can alter some of the ingredients to suit your particular culinary preferences/possible food allergies, and play with the recipe to make it your own! I’ve made this a full seafood chowder by tossing in chunks of whitefish, some crab or lobster, and a few handfuls of shrimp, for example. I’ll often make a batch of this a day in advance so all the flavours have had a chance to meld beautifully, but it’s difficult to refrain from having a small bowl (or three) as soon as it’s done.

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Ingredients:

Part 1: Broth
4 cups water
2 cups firm white potatoes, peeled and diced
3/4 cup white onion, diced (or 1/2 cup onion, 1/4 cup thinly sliced leek whites)
3/4 cup carrots, peeled and diced
Bring the water to a rolling boil in a large soup pot, then add the potatoes, onions, and carrots. Bring the heat down to a simmer and cook until the vegetables are tender (usually 8-12 minutes).

Part 2: Sauce
4 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons all-purpose flour (standard or gluten-free, your call)
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon mustard powder
2 cups milk (or 1 cup milk, 1 cup half-and-half cream if you’d like this soup to be really rich and creamy)
2 cups extra old cheddar cheese, grated

Begin part 2 once you’ve set the vegetables to simmer. Melt the butter in a saucepan on medium heat, then whisk the flour in bit by bit to make a good, thick roux.
Slowly add the milk, whisking quickly the entire time. Add pepper and mustard, then add the grated cheddar in small quantities, using a spoon to stir the mixture in order to blend it evenly.
Once it’s completely mixed, pour this mixture into the vegetable broth.

Part 3: Clams
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce (gluten-free if required)
3 cans (10 oz ea.) baby clams, including the juice
1 tablespoon fresh parsley, minced
Combine these three ingredients in a bowl, and then add to the soup pot. Use a large spoon to stir everything thoroughly, then allow to simmer for 5-10 minutes longer.

Serve accompanied by really good, crusty bread and a crisp white wine.

CupOChowdah

FTW Kitchen: Good for What Ails ‘ya Ugly Carrot Soup

Market season, for me, really begins in Autumn. Autumn has been a bit finicky, of late: not showing up at all two years ago, and quite delayed last year. But this year, frost has already come to Ontario and I immediately lined myself up at the market this weekend for bags of ‘unwanted’ carrots.

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My favorite stall is run by Fiddle Foot Farm, about twenty minutes from here. They plant heirloom varieties of all vegetables, and have the sweetest beets I’ve ever eaten. They also sell their ‘unwanted’ produce by the bags full for just five bucks.

When that happens, I make a big batch of ugly carrot soup. Made with a few peasant ingredients from all around, this soup is yummy, reduces inflammation, is soothing on the throat and pleasing to the eye. If you’re into balancing chakras, the yellows and oranges are vibrant and well suited to a balancing diet.

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Now, if you don’t have access to ugly, unwanted carrots, I am so sorry. Regular straight n’ narrows will work too, but they won’t make you laugh, or taste as sweet. You can also substitute Yukon Gold or another starchy tuber for the purple sweet potato, if you can’t find those. If using regular sweet potatoes, though, keep in mind the flavors will be different, and the texture a little runny.

Ingredients
About 1.5 lbs ‘ugly’ carrots. This was ten for me.
2 large cloves garlic, diced
1 large yellow onion diced
2 stalks celery, diced, plus leaves
1 large purple sweet potato, peeled and diced
2 TBSP grass fed, or best butter you can get
1 TBSP coconut oil
1 – 2 tsp ground turmeric (or more, if you are like me and staving off the sicks)
1 tsp grated ginger
1 can coconut milk (plus 2 cans water)
Himalayan salt, or sea salt
a few grinds of pepper, or 1 tsp
10 sage leaves, or other herb, roughly chopped
Splash of runny honey, or maple syrup

Method
Warm butter and oil on medium low heat, in a large stock pot.
Add turmeric, and cook with the butter for about a minute.
Add onion, garlic and celery, and cook another two minutes.
Add carrot, and potato, along with salt, pepper and ginger, stir thoroughly, allow all veg to saute 5 minutes on medium, stirring here and there.

Add sage leaves or herbs, splash of sweetness and stir.
Add coconut milk, and water.
Bring mixture to the boil, then cover, reduce heat to low and let simmer at least 30 mins, but preferably an hour.

Blend soup in a blender, or use hand blender. Season again to taste.
Serve with some roasted root vegetables, garlicky greens, and whatever else you like. Enjoy the beauty of Autumn, and the delicious flavor of being different.

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sorrel soup, sorrel spring soup, sorrel, French sorrel, garden sorrel, sauerampfer suppe, sauerampfer, herb soup

FTW Kitchen: Sorrel Soup

By Catherine Winter

Here in zone 4, very few greens sprout up until mid May at the very earliest. While friends in England start posting photos of snowdrops and daffodils in February, I have to wait until the snow clears (a few months after that…) to see the first greens unfurl. Fortunately, right after dandelions make their appearance, sorrel springs up in great, abundant heaps, just asking to be devoured.

sorrel, garden sorrel, French sorrel, lemon sorrel, perennial vegetable, perennial sorrel

I grow a variety of herbs and perennial greens in my potager garden, just outside my kitchen door, and it’s always a delight to bite into the first, lemony sorrel leaves when they show up after the long, cold Quebec winter. Springtime came earlier than usual this year (which was a delightful surprise), so I have chives and thyme coming up as well. Since the evenings out here are still quite chilly, I decide to gather a bunch of sorrel and put some soup together for dinner.

I grew up with sauerampfer soup, but my family’s recipe was very heavy on cream and egg yolks, and I found it to be way too heavy. I’ve adapted my own recipe to incorporate whatever’s in season (and in the fridge), and omitted the cream and eggs: I use fat-free plain yoghurt instead.

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Ingredients:

Olive oil or butter or Earth Balance (for frying)
1 small to medium onion, peeled and diced
1/2 teaspoon thyme, finely chopped
1 small bunch green onions or chives, finely chopped
2 medium potatoes, grated or finely chopped
A couple of big handfuls of sorrel leaves, shredded
4 cups of your favourite stock (I use chicken stock, but leek or onion stock works really well in this
1/3 cup plain yoghurt or sour cream (dairy or vegan)
Lemon juice (fresh, not concentrated!)
Salt and black pepper

Heat your butter or oil in a large stock pot on medium-high heat, and add the onions and thyme, stirring often until the onions soften and start to turn golden.

Add the stock, green onions, and potatoes, and stir well. Bring this mixture to a boil, then reduce to a simmer. Let that bubble away merrily until the potatoes have softened.

Toss in those sorrel leaves, which will turn a sort of murky olive green as soon as it hits the heat: don’t be alarmed, it’ll still taste fabulous.

Use an immersion blender to puree approximately half of the soup, or scoop out half of it and put it through a standard blender or food processor, adding it back to the pot when you’re done. If you find the soup too thick, feel free to add some more stock to thin it out. Stir in the yoghurt or sour cream, and a tablespoon or so of lemon juice. Add salt to taste, and feel free to add more lemon if you like as well.

sorrel soup, sorrel soup recipe, immersion blender, pureeing soup

The sour cream or yoghurt are optional and are just used to make the soup creamy, but you can also use pureed cannellini beans if you’d like to add protein and a silky texture. Some people prefer not to mix the sour cream into the dish, but instead add a dollop of it into the bowl just prior to serving, along with chopped raw sorrel, parsley, or dill.

I made this soup with what I had on hand, but it can be adapted so many ways. Fresh sweet green peas make a great addition as soon as they’re available, and swapping out half of the sorrel for spinach adds more iron and greenness to the pot. I’ve added leftover roasted zucchini, used cauliflower instead of potato… but the one common denominator is always the gorgeous lemony bite from the sorrel.

Do you grow this plant in your garden? How do you like to prepare it? Let us know!

 

Photos by the author, and lead image is by Neal Foley via Flickr Creative Commons.