Glögg.

By Catherine Winter

As I write this, it’s -23C outside. The sun set shortly after 4pm, and I’ve been huddled beneath blankets half the day, wearing fingerless gloves as I typed. It’s very obvious that the solstice is just a few days away, and these few days and nights leading up to Yule are cold, and dark, and long. It’s on evenings such as this one that I appreciate a warm drink to wrap my hands around and sip, as it feels cold enough outside that the stars themselves may crack and shatter.

Glögg is a gorgeous mulled wine that’s easy to put together, wonderful to drink (and share with others), and since it’s packed with anti-oxidants that can help you fight off winter colds and flus, it’s also good for you!

Cinnamon

Ingredients and Supplies:

A small linen or muslin bag for your spices
2 x 750 ml bottles of decent red wine
2 cups of brandy
A small organic orange (like a clementine), sliced thinly horizontally
1/2 cup brown sugar, or 1/3 cup honey, or 1/3 cup maple syrup
2-3 cinnamon sticks, broken into large pieces
8 cloves (whole)

Optional Garnishes:

Whole blanched almonds
Sweetened dried cherries or currants

MulledWine
Directions:

Place the cinnamon sticks and cloves in your spice bag and tie tightly.

In a large soup pot on medium heat, combine the wine and brandy, then stir in the sugar until it dissolves. Toss in the spice bag and orange slices, then turn the heat down low and heat it for 30-40 min so the spices really have a chance to steep. Don’t let it boil or it’ll taste burnt.

Once warmed, place a scant few almonds and cherries (or currants) in mugs and then ladle the hot liquid over them. If you like, place one of the orange slices in there as well. Make spoons available so people can scoop out and eat the boozy nuts and berries as they sip this glorious, warming drink.

Skål!

Trifle with Love

By Catherine Winter

There are few desserts as simple, and yet as satisfying as a trifle. It can be whipped together in just a few minutes, but is a perfectly elegant centrepiece for any holiday dessert table. Best of all, you can adapt it to any dietary restriction or preference, whether it’s gluten-free, vegan, dairy-free, or wholly raw.

When it comes to putting together a trifle, the sky is the limit. The classic arrangement is layers of alcohol-laced pound cake or ladyfinger biscuits alternating with layers of vanilla pudding, mixed berries or sliced fruit, and topped with whipped cream, but honestly? Make it your own!

Chocolate Trifle

Whip up some vegan coconut cream and alternate that with layers of peach slices and ginger cookies, or alternate layers of wafers with chocolate pudding, nuts, and malted chocolate balls.

‘Tis the season to be creative with delicious foods, right? What will you trifle with this season? Let us know in the comments section!

Sugar and Spice

by Pamela Capriotti Martin

I grew up in a neighborhood with lots of young families in 25 houses with 68 kids. While my mother was the only one who had a full-time out of home job, the others served as afternoon surrogates with cookies, brownies, and treats galore. Every Christmas we would bake 24 dozen cookies and bring them to the annual cookie swap. I both dreaded the work and loved the exchange. The kids had our favorites and with no disrespect meant to the other mothers – we all loved Mrs. Jensen’s cookies the best. Mrs. Jensen was from Sweden and we thought her so worldly. Mr. Jensen was Danish, and as I found out when I interviewed him for a college Oral History project, was a leading member of the Danish Underground during World War II. He met Mrs. Jensen, a nurse, when he ferried Jewish families from Denmark to Sweden where she and others moved them to safety. The Danish Resistance managed to evacuate 7,220 of Denmark’s 7,800 Jews plus 686 non-Jewish spouses, by sea to nearby neutral Sweden. Sadly, I lost the tape of our interview, but I remember every detail very well. I remember being so awestruck that this hero was living down the street that I barely could keep my eyes on my notes and ask him questions. Thank heavens for a tape recorder. They were an amazing family right in our little neighborhood.

Mrs. Jensen was a sweet lady who made the most delicate horseshoe shaped Swedish ginger cookies. We waited ever year for the crispy brown cookies and coveted the recipe although she never parted with it. My mother made Norwegian sandbakkels (a crispy almond sugar cookie baked in a fluted tin) every year. Many of the mothers in the neighborhood had Scandinavian roots and then there was Mrs. Gallagher (Lebanese) and Mrs. Grady (Irish) and Mrs. Woodburn (German). Popular cookies with the kids were candy cane sugar cookies, a wonderful stained glass cookie, spritz with sprinkles (although we always thought they were too small), almond snowball cookies, and always some great baklava which technically isn’t a cookie but it was much appreciated.image1.jpeg

Here are three of our favorite cookie recipes – my favorite easy shortbread, my grandmother’s favorite molasses cookies and my recipe for cranberry and pistachio biscotti.

Shortbread

Ingredients:
3/4 pound unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 cup sugar, plus extra for sprinkling
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract (I use a heavy hand on this)
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350 F

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, mix together the butter and 1 cup of sugar until they are just combined. Add the vanilla. In a medium bowl, sift together the flour and salt, then add them to the butter-and-sugar mixture. Mix on low speed until the dough starts to come together. Dump onto a surface dusted with flour and shape into a flat disk. Wrap in plastic and chill for 30 minutes.

Roll the dough 1/2-inch thick and cut with a cookie cutter of your desired shape. Place the cookies on an ungreased baking sheet and sprinkle with sugar. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the edges begin to brown. Allow to cool to room temperature.

**Don’t want to roll them out – I generally don’t. Halve the dough, roll into two logs, (I always freeze one) cut them ½ inch thick and follow baking directions above. To festive them up – dip in melted chocolate of your choice.

Cranberry Pistachio Biscotti

Ingredients:
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup boiling water
3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
1 cup sugar, plus more for sprinkling
3 large eggs, plus 1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup (2 1/2 ounces) unsalted pistachios, coarsely chopped

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper; set aside. Place cranberries in a small bowl; add boiling water. Let stand until plump, about 15 minutes. Drain, and set aside. Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt into a medium bowl; set aside.

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat butter and sugar on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add 3 eggs, one at a time, beating to incorporate after each addition and scraping down sides of bowl as needed. Beat in vanilla. Add flour mixture, and mix on low speed until combined. Mix in cranberries and pistachios.

Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface; divide in half. Shape each piece into a 16-by-2-inch log, and transfer to prepared baking sheet, about 3 inches apart. With the palm of your hand, flatten logs slightly. Brush beaten egg over surface of the dough logs, and sprinkle generously with sugar.

Bake, rotating sheet halfway through, until logs are slightly firm to touch, about 25 minutes. Transfer logs on parchment paper to a wire rack to cool slightly, about 20 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 300 degrees.

Place logs on a cutting board. Using a serrated knife, cut logs crosswise on the diagonal into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Place a wire rack on a large rimmed baking sheet. Arrange slices, cut sides down, on rack. Bake until firm to touch, about 30 minutes. Remove pan from oven; let biscotti cool completely on rack. Biscotti can be kept in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 week.

Great-Grandma’s Molasses Cookies

Ingredients:
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
3/4 teaspoons ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 large egg
1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted
1/3 cup granulated sugar
1/3 cup mild-flavored (light) or robust-flavored (dark) molasses
1/4 cup (packed) dark brown sugar
Coarse sanding or raw sugar (for rolling)

Directions

Place racks in lower and upper thirds of oven; preheat to 375°F. Whisk flour, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, and salt in a small bowl. Whisk egg, butter, granulated sugar, molasses, and brown sugar in a medium bowl. Mix in dry ingredients just to combine.

Place sanding sugar in a shallow bowl. Scoop out dough by the tablespoonful and roll into balls (if dough is sticky, chill 20 minutes). Roll in sugar and place on 2 parchment-lined baking sheets, spacing 2″ apart.

Bake cookies, rotating baking sheets halfway through, until cookies are puffed, cracked, and just set around edges (over-baked cookies won’t be chewy), 8–10 minutes. Transfer to wire racks and let cool.

MAKE AHEAD: Cookie dough can be made and rolled into balls 2 weeks ahead. Freeze on a baking sheet; transfer to resealable plastic bags. Let sit at room temperature 30 minutes before rolling in sugar.image1 (2).jpeg

Krampus is a Comin’

by MK Martin

Have you been good? Hide all your birch switches, and say something kind to everyone you see today. In many parts of Europe, St. Nicholas Day is celebrated December 6th. On the night before, the horned devil Krampus roams the streets, seeking out the homes of naughty children. Mostly, he just swats at them, but some stories suggest very naughty children will be eaten! With that in mind, here are two sweet Icelandic recipes to try. Maybe if you leave him a little shortcake, he’ll walk on by.

Coconut Wreaths
(makes about 2 dozen)
These are pretty, and they smell great.wreath.jpg

The recipe calls for a cookie press, which is a tube gun you attach a metal thing to at the end. If you don’t want to use one, you can roll little balls and flatten on the cookie sheet, or try to loosely shape the wreaths yourself, but the dough gets a bit hard to handle! I found a free form photo above ^^

Ingredients:

200 g flour
200 g dessicated coconut
150 g sugar
200 g butter, softened
1 egg

Mix the flour, coconut and sugar. A whisk works well here.

Fold in the egg and butter, and mix until it just comes together. I know, it’s counter intuitive to most cookie directions, but it will come together.

Run the dough through the cookie press, fitted with a simple attachment, and run it through in lengths of about 6 cm, which you then shape into a wreath right on the baking sheet.

Bake at 350, for 8 minutes (but you know my rule, check after 7), until light and golden.

Icelandic Spice Cake

Here is a cake full of the flavor of the holidays, without the weight and prep time of a fruit cake. The warming spices are anti inflammatory, and anti bacterial, even if they’re being mixed with sugar. A little dark cocoa ups the ‘health’ factor.This is also a cake you mix by hand, but you might be able to get away with a stand mixer on lowest setting. (makes enough cake for two layers, but is often cut into 4. You can do a sheet pan as well.)

Ingredients

500 g flour
350 g sugar
250 g butter
2 eggs
3 tsp ground cloves
3 tsp cinnamon
2 tsp baking soda
2 tbs dark cocoa
milk, as needed

*What does ‘as needed’ mean? For many European cake recipes, a kneaded dough is used, rather than a batter. This is batter style, but the recipe still calls for a ‘medium thick’ batter, such as a muffin might have. I pour out a 1/2 cup of milk and use that, usually all of it. *

Cream together sugar and butter. Mix in the eggs, one at a time, until incorporated.

Sift, or whisk, your dry ingredients together. Add to the butter mixture a few TBSP at a time, mix, then a splash of milk. This is why this part is better done by hand, as it will go faster than it sounds and not be overmixed.

Pour into greased 8 in cake tins, and bake at 350 for 40 minutes, give or take, depending on your oven. My bake time always varies, thanks to spotty heat.

Serve frosted with layers of buttercream, or our favorite: for breakfast with a little fresh whipped cream.

cake.jpg

Sugar Cookies for Every Day

by MK Martin

The only STEM subject I enjoyed in school was Chemistry. It’s pretty easy to make the jump from chemistry to ‘alchemy’ in the mind, and making fantasy a part of my reality was a form of anxiety quelling mechanism that, whether for better or worse has been my constant companion. The Food Network happened to be in its relative infancy while I was finishing high school, and a hibernating interest awakened.
DSC_0138.JPG
A lot of noted worriers love baking. It’s a mid brain exercise, calling up some of your more complicated cognitive equations to partner with the ritual zen movements of creating something to eat. Cooking is the first ritual, one we all need and one we all infuse with love whether we realize it or not. Is there anything more loving than giving someone a big tin full of cookies? Sure, we know sugar is evil now, but in between the Omegas and the kale massages, our primitive honey seeking hunter gatherer brain is asking ‘but where is the honey?’

Kids tantalized by the glory of the season can get overwhelmed, and be full of Ferrero Rochers before anyone’s the wiser. Not that I’d know. Having a little tin of cookies you can have with tea after school in festive shapes means not being asked for Ice Cream in the dead of mid winter. As Martha would say, it’s a good thing.24313163_10155299697563737_6792725580191210636_o.jpg

These cookies are not vegan, but the substitutes for vegan fat options like coconut oil are one to one, and you may use all manner of things as an alternative binder. 3 TBSP of chia seeds, soaked, or 1/2 cup of that ‘new’ aquafaba, for example. Which is literally the bean juice from a can. I recommend chick pea, for minimal odor.

I am, however, using all Canadian non GMO milled wheat, and butter made over in Alliston about 40 minutes from here. Using what’s made nearby usually means your ingredients can last a little longer, and they’ve supported someone in your community.

I don’t ice cookies anymore, preferring instead to make a million little cookie sandwiches, filled with successful or failed ganache, lemon curd, freezer jam, ice cream, etc. Maybe you have a new idea for me?

For the Cookies

3 cups leveled flour
1 tsp baking powder
pinch sea salt
1 cup unsalted butter
1/2 tsp cinnamon, or more
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup sugar
1 large egg

In a separate bowl, whisk together dry ingredients.

Beat egg and vanilla together. Using a mechanical mixture, or your own bare arms and forceful intentions, cream together the butter and sugar.

If you have a stand mixture, you can fit your machine with the dough hook and slowly add the flour one cup a time, while set to low. Otherwise, add and mix by hand, do not overmix. It will begin to clump together.

This dough can be tacky, so I turn it out into a floured glass pie plate to form into two discs. Wrap individually with plastic wrap and chill at least 30 minutes. At this time, you can also freeze your dough for later.

If you have a marble rolling counter, you’re winning. Otherwise, you can use a piece of wax paper to roll your cookies out to desired thickness. Thinner cookies will take less time to bake. We usually aim for 1/2 inch thick.

Transfer to parchment lined baking sheet, or silpat, or bare if you’re feeling lucky. Bake for 7-11 minutes at 350 degrees, again, depending on thickness. To err on the side of caution, just set your time for seven minutes and check the edges have set. Allow to cool on a wire rack before icing. If you are using sprinkles, you can press a few in that have shapes ahead of baking, but jimmies tend to melt.

Pflaumenkuchen, plum cake, German plum cake, plum cake recipe, German cake recipe, Christmas recipe, Christmas dessert, Yule dessert, Jul dessert

Pflaumenkuchen (German Plum Cake)

By Catherine Winter

My mother’s side of the family is a mix of German, Scandinavian, and Slavic, so our holiday traditions incorporated aspects from a number of different countries and cultures. Every year, we could look forward to the ritual of advent candles being lit, evergreens decorated (both indoors and outside!), and we could also rely on the exact same foods being served every single year. I enjoyed the gravlax, winced at the rotkohl, and always looked forward to what would become one of my all-time favourite desserts: this plum cake.

Pflaumenkuchen embodies everything I love in a dessert, particularly during the holidays. As I don’t have much of a sweet tooth, the plums’ tartness counteracts the sugar in the crust, and a single slice of this cake tends to have more fruit than pastry in it, which is just exquisite. Every time I bake it, I consider that we may indeed be fortunate to be able to buy armfuls of fruit at the grocery store year-round, but with the scarcity that would have existed during the winter in bygone eras, a cake like this—packed with butter and fresh fruit—would have been incredibly precious to my ancestors.

As such, it is quite perfect for a special holiday meal, and shared with loved ones.

Pflaumenkuchen, plum cake, German plum cake, plum cake recipe, German cake recipe, Christmas recipe, Christmas dessert, Yule dessert, Jul dessert

Pflaumenkuchen

3 pounds of dark blue/purple plums: prune or empress, pits removed, halved if small, quartered if larger
2 cups of whatever flour you like best
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
A pinch of salt
1⁄4 cup butter or Earth Balance
1 egg, beaten (or equivalent vegan egg substitute)
1 teaspoon almond extract
1/3 cup milk (approximate, and milk can be dairy, soy, or almond)
1 additional tablespoon sugar mixed with 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon for sprinkling on top

Preheat the your oven to 350 degrees F. Mix the dry ingredients together in a large bowl, then cut the butter in with a fork. Do not blend too well at this point.

In another bowl, mix the egg and the almond extract together, then add the milk bit by bit, whisking thoroughly, until you have 3/8 of a cup of wet ingredients. Using a spoon, blend this mixture into the dry ingredients, then work them together with your hands, forming a soft dough. Should you find that the dough sticks to your hands quite a bit, add a tiny bit more flour as needed.

Making plum cake

Grease a 9 x 12 baking pan, and then use your hands to spread the dough across it, forming an even crust. If you have a bit of extra dough, just work it up the sides of the baking pan to form edges. Press the plum halves into the dough so that said dough pushes up between them a little bit, then sprinkle each with a pinch of the cinnamon sugar.

Bake for approximately one hour, or until the crust has gone just golden and the plums are fork-tender. Note that the plums will turn a deep magenta hue as they bake, and if you leave the cake in the oven too long, they’ll leak a lot of juice into the crust. You want the crust to be a bit soft, and the plums still maintaining integrity.

Pflaumenkuchen, plum cake, German plum cake, plum cake recipe, German cake recipe, Christmas recipe, Christmas dessert, Yule dessert, Jul dessert

Remove from the oven and allow to cool for a good 30 minutes or so before serving. Cut into squares or slices, and serve as they are, or with a generous dollop of whipped cream or custard on top.

This really is a gorgeous dessert to have after Christmas/Yule dinner, but it’s just as wonderful for breakfast the next day.

Fröhliche Weihnachten/God Jul!

Swedish-Santa.jpg

 

 

Our Pasta Fazoo

By Pamela Capriotti Martin

In my husband’s Italian/Irish household there were very specific dinners for every night of the week with some variations. Sunday was always a roast and his mother would make a sauce for the week ahead, which may have been used on a carne pizzaiola, or just pasta. Other nights there would be Nana potatoes and pork chops, minced beef and onions with a Bisto gravy served over mashed potatoes with a side of turnip or peas, and on Fridays, if there was money – fish and chips. If money was tighter than usual it would be chips and eggs or chips and beans. If the Sunday roast was a ham then the bone would be available for a nice pasta e fagioli later in the week. Like many households in the 1950’s in Canada and the U.S, this was a family. on a tight budget. Beans and pasta made for a great week night dinner and meat was meant to be stretched to feed a family of five.

Most of my children are fans of the soup, although M2 was never enamored as a child. M3 feels quite proprietary about her soup. She would order it in every Italian restaurant we frequented and then rate it. One chef took her to the restaurant kitchen and showed her how he made his version. She didn’t like the kidney beans. She was six. I’m pretty sure she told him he was ruining the soup. Another, Chef Frank would see the girls walking in Yorkville and would make it only for them since it wasn’t even on his upscale Italian menu. It’s Italian comfort food.

The dish has simple inexpensive ingredients and began as a peasant dish. John’s mother was from Naples and so while the word for beans is ‘fagioli’ in standard Italian, it’s ‘fasule’ in Neopolitan. So in this house, this simple family favorite, is affectionately known as “fazoo.”

I was introduced to my mother-in-law Giulia’s version of the soup when we traveled to John’s parents every Saturday for lunch. While I felt it was okay – I thought it lacked something. It became a discussion for us as to how we could give the soup more depth of flavor.

22791717_10155186210738737_2886828059954442444_o

John’s mother always used only water in hers and when she taught me to make it was specific that I was to use only four tomatoes from the can. The water in the soup was changed to chicken stock and I cut mine with water in about a 60/40 ratio, and John uses only chicken stock. If you don’t have that handy ham bone, we use pancetta. I find bacon too salty and don’t like the smoky flavor here, but would use it in a pinch and pull the salt back and use low-sodium chicken stock. Vegetarian M3 won’t use chicken stock or a meat product so substitutes vegetable stock.

This is one of those recipes that depends on who is making it and what you have in your pantry and fridge. I’m certain every Italian household has their own version and certainly John and I even have our own way of making this flavorful and filling soup. Little hands can pick basil leaves or grate cheese to make this a family event. This is my recipe. So, this is a starting point and is definitely open to change with the person who stirs the pot – of soup.

1 T extra virgin olive oil
Extra virgin olive oil for drizzling
3 ounces pancetta (or bacon)
1 medium onion, chopped fine
4 medium cloves of garlic, minced
1 t dried basil
1 28 ounce can San Marzano tomatoes (diced works well)
1 Parmesan cheese rind
2 cans (15 ounce each) Cannellini beans (drained and rinsed)
4 cups chicken broth
2 cups water
8 ounces small pasta (ditalini, tubetini, conchigliette)
¼ cup fresh parsley chopped
Black pepper, salt
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese

1. Heat oil in large Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering but not smoking, about 2 minutes. Add pancetta and cook, stirring occasionally, until beginning to brown, 3 to 5 minutes.
2. Add onion; cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Add garlic, basil (not fresh), stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 1 minute. 3. Add tomatoes, scraping up any browned bits from bottom of pan.
4. Add cheese rind and beans; bring to boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer to blend flavors, 10 minutes.
5. Add chicken broth, 2 cups water, and 1 teaspoon salt; increase heat to high and bring to boil.

6. Cook pasta separately and until tender, about 10 minutes. If you keep the pasta separate and put it in the bowl under the soup, then you can actually reheat the soup base the next day and just boil a new batch of pasta. If you add it to the soup, the pasta becomes flabby and honestly – ruins it.

7. Discard cheese rind. Off heat, stir in 3 tablespoons parsley; adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Ladle soup into individual bowls over pasta portion; drizzle each serving with olive oil and sprinkle with a portion of remaining parsley. Serve immediately, passing grated Parmesan separately.

22770482_10155186211378737_5974648243879978803_o

soup, broth, bone broth, cup of soup, healing broth, healing bone broth

Bone Broth: A Nutrient-Dense, Healing Elixir

By Catherine Winter

Many people are discovering the wonders of bone broth, and with good cause: not only is this soup immensely soothing when you’re under the weather, it’s one of the most nutrient-dense foods you can eat. Bones from animals that have been raised ethically (namely on organic feed and grass, and free-range living conditions) contain a startling amount of vitamins and minerals. By first roasting and then simmering those bones in water, all that goodness is leached out of them, and in turn, can be consumed by you.

Among the many benefits of bone broth, which include strengthening one’s immune system and promoting overall gut healing, it’s also ideal for reducing stress. When consumed mindfully, savouring each sip and picturing it healing one’s body, it becomes more than just a nourishing drink. It helps one stay in the present moment, which is as good for one’s emotional wellbeing as one’s physical health.

soup ingredients, soup vegetables

Ingredients:

3-4 pounds of beef bones: assorted meat and marrow bones are ideal. You can also toss in chicken bones, chicken feet, turkey wings… whatever you have on hand.
1 large onion, peeled and chopped
1 large carrot, peeled and diced
1 celery stalk, diced
1 large bunch of green onions, chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1 pinch of summer or winter savoury
1 teaspoon parsley
Sea salt

soup, soup recipe, bone broth, bone broth recipe, healing bone broth

Preparation:

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Place the bones in a heavy glass or ceramic baking dish and roast for about 45 minutes. The marrow should have softened or melted by this point, and that’s good! Pour the bones and any melty drippings into a large stock pot or slow-cooker.

Toss in the vegetables and herbs, and cover with about 2 inches of water. Add in the cider vinegar and a bit of salt. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a low simmer for 6-10 hours. If you’re using a crock pot or slow-cooker, you can leave it for up to 24 hours. The longer you let this simmer, the more nutrients will be drawn out of the bones, and the flavours will develop beautifully.

Once done, allow to cool slightly and then strain through cheesecloth into another pot. Place this in the fridge until the excess fats and oils congeal into a thick mass on top, and scrape that off. (Reserve that fat: you can mix it with seeds and set it out in mesh bags for your wild bird friends.)

If your broth has gone gelatinous, don’t worry! That’s a good thing. It means that a lot of collagen has been drawn out of the bones, which is great for your own bone, joint, and muscle health. The broth will return to a liquid state once you’ve heated it up, and you can adjust the salt to taste before drinking it.

 

family sunday soup, sunday soup, beef soup, beef and vegetable soup

FTW Kitchen: Family Sunday Soup

By Pamela Capriotti Martin

I grew up in a family without many food traditions. How could that be for a girl with an Italian last name? My mother was Norwegian, and while my grandmother was a marvelous cook, I don’t think my mother ever really cared to cook. Or bake. She loved the convenience foods that came to be in the 50’s and 60’s and she worked full-time from the time I was 4. Dinner was never a priority although it should be noted, we definitely ate dinner every night.

When I was a senior in high school, my mother broke her leg and was unable to walk without crutches for months as it required surgery. I took over the cooking. Totally. And the shopping. I had a cookbook and taught myself to cook before cooking shows existed. I worked my way through the book to the delight (lasagna) and annoyance (eggplant parmesan) of my brothers and father.

Onions

When I married my Italian/Irish husband – he loved cooking. So we cooked. And created. And Sunday has always been my day to cook. Pot roasts, roasted chicken, buttermilk pound cake, apple pie, and the family favorite – Sunday Soup. Because Sunday is about family. It’s about comforting food. And it’s about the joy of fresh ingredients melding together to create a family tradition of love.

The recipe for Sunday Soup, so named by my girls, originated in a cookbook I bought from the Cookbook Store in Toronto in 1986. Today, we can find recipes on the internet in moments, but not so in the 80’s. This soup and so many other family recipe traditions we have built as a family is about my daughters – who all are wonderful cooks – and the memories we created as we cooked together. Some days we learned fractions by measuring. Some days we created disasters that looked better in our minds than it did on a plate or in a bowl. And some days we logged time just simply being together creating, experimenting, and eating the spoils.

It should be noted that this is a full meal soup accompanied by a crusty bread, a little cheese, and possibly, just possibly a homemade apple pie – hence the apples in the picture.

This is our family’s: Sunday Soup (adapted from Soups and Stews by California Culinary Academy)

Beef-soup-ingredients

2 T Olive Oil
2 1/2 – 3 lb beef short ribs (bone in)
2 medium onions (I like Vidalia but a white or yellow onion works as well)
2 stalks celery, thinly sliced
3 cloves garlic (grated)
1 red pepper seeded and chopped
1 – 2 t chili powder (this is the ingredient that makes this soup sing)
1 large can/box chopped tomatoes
2 large carrots, thinly sliced
4-6 small red potatoes quartered (scrubbed but not peeled)
1 bay leaf
2 t salt
1/2 t pepper
1/2 t dried marjoram
8 cups chicken stock (or water but the stock gives it greater depth)
1 cup small pasta
1/2 cup chopped parsley

  1. Salt and pepper short ribs. In a 6 – 8 quart Dutch oven over medium heat, add olive oil and brown short ribs well on all sides. Add onion, celery, garlic, and bell pepper around ribs, stirring occasionally until vegetables are limp. Sprinkle with chili powder.
  2. Add tomatoes and liquid, half the carrots, bay leaf, salt, pepper, marjoram and chicken stock. Bring to a boil and cover. Reduce the heat, and simmer until meat is tender (3 – 4 hours.)
  3. Remove and discard bay leaf. Remove short ribs; when cool, remove meat from bones. Cut meat into bite size pieces, return to soup discarding fat and bones. Soup can be made to this point, when at room temperature, place in fridge overnight.
  4. At this point, I add the remaining carrot and potatoes and bring it to a boil, reduce heat until new vegetables are tender.
  5. While soup is finishing, boil salted water, add pasta. When pasta is cooked al dente, drain, don’t rinse. Place ladle of pasta in bottom of soup bowl.
  6. Taste soup, adjust salt if needed, add parsley and serve over pasta.

NB: This is a forgiving soup in terms of adding vegetables – more, less, whatever you like or have on hand. I often add turnip or rutabaga and definitely peas are generally put in at the end to give it more color.

 

FTW Kitchen: Creamy Clam Chowder

By Catherine Winter

Another in our Souper Sunday series, this clam chowder recipe has been in my family for years. I recently made a batch of this with potatoes, carrots, and a bit of parsley from the garden, and it’s just gorgeous for a chilly autumn or winter evening.

You can alter some of the ingredients to suit your particular culinary preferences/possible food allergies, and play with the recipe to make it your own! I’ve made this a full seafood chowder by tossing in chunks of whitefish, some crab or lobster, and a few handfuls of shrimp, for example. I’ll often make a batch of this a day in advance so all the flavours have had a chance to meld beautifully, but it’s difficult to refrain from having a small bowl (or three) as soon as it’s done.

Ingredients.png

Ingredients:

Part 1: Broth
4 cups water
2 cups firm white potatoes, peeled and diced
3/4 cup white onion, diced (or 1/2 cup onion, 1/4 cup thinly sliced leek whites)
3/4 cup carrots, peeled and diced
Bring the water to a rolling boil in a large soup pot, then add the potatoes, onions, and carrots. Bring the heat down to a simmer and cook until the vegetables are tender (usually 8-12 minutes).

Part 2: Sauce
4 tablespoons butter
4 tablespoons all-purpose flour (standard or gluten-free, your call)
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon mustard powder
2 cups milk (or 1 cup milk, 1 cup half-and-half cream if you’d like this soup to be really rich and creamy)
2 cups extra old cheddar cheese, grated

Begin part 2 once you’ve set the vegetables to simmer. Melt the butter in a saucepan on medium heat, then whisk the flour in bit by bit to make a good, thick roux.
Slowly add the milk, whisking quickly the entire time. Add pepper and mustard, then add the grated cheddar in small quantities, using a spoon to stir the mixture in order to blend it evenly.
Once it’s completely mixed, pour this mixture into the vegetable broth.

Part 3: Clams
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce (gluten-free if required)
3 cans (10 oz ea.) baby clams, including the juice
1 tablespoon fresh parsley, minced
Combine these three ingredients in a bowl, and then add to the soup pot. Use a large spoon to stir everything thoroughly, then allow to simmer for 5-10 minutes longer.

Serve accompanied by really good, crusty bread and a crisp white wine.

CupOChowdah